Psychonaut

Version complète : Ayahuasca although drug addiction (for overcoming it)?
Vous consultez actuellement la version basse qualité d’un document. Voir la version complète avec le bon formatage.
Hey guys,

as an addicted you dont are "allowed" to use any drug any time again in your life - even one swallow alcohol will turn you back into the daily drug abuse (that is how the medicine-science said).

But maybe there is a difference in taking Ayahuasca to understand its own addiction more and more and mybe to see the real reasons for its addiction? Is that daydreaming or possible to take Ayahuasca without being relapsed?

Thank you very much!
I will speak as an alcoholic in recovery, in addition to being a person actively (regularly) involved in drinking the Hoasca (so-called "vegetal tea").
It is my experience that only a Higher Power can cure an addiction--of any type. Until a person finds a H.P. (Higher Power) which works in his/her life, s/he WILL use again; or substitute one substance for another.
I think this is the "spirit" of the question you may be asking: if, upon taking hoasca once, if it will lead to a relapse of drinking? Or, if Hoasca Herself is addictive, to an addictive personality?

As an alcoholic in recovery, I go to A.A. meetings almost daily (5, or 6 times a week), and work the AA principles in my life. I have done the steps with a sponsor, and am willing to take others through this program of recovery.
I personally feel it extremely important for one in recovery to find him/herself a homegroup, and attend regular meetings; to get a sponsor, and live within the precepts of the AA program. For this alcoholic in recovery, there is no substitute to proper daily living; to find a life within the auspices of the program of recovery, period.
For those suffering other substances addictions, the same applies to the NA or similar, program. There is no substitute for the addict in recovery, than in a 12-step program. The PRIMARY means of recovery is through the loving assistance of one's H.P.
Again, it is through God's Spirit: Her grace, mercy and wisdom, which keeps me sober and living in the solution, not rolling around in the problem, as the problem.

Hopefully, at this point, you can see where I'm going with the "drinking of the vegetal tea" (as we call a session of Hoasca ceremony.)
"Drinking the tea" (ingesting hoasca) is not a recreational, nor casual exercise. Drinking the hoasca tea is a life-changing experience, best done only when someone is serious about changing his/her life.
Until one is ready to analyze or evaluate their reasons for drinking, or other addictive behavious, one is also not ready for the Tea. If one is not ready to stop drinking, that one is not ready for the tea either.

Whether or not one wants it, within the Hoasca ceremony, he or she will get in touch with a Higher Power, which will cause that one to see many of their glaring defects, immediately. If one is not ready to address his, or her defects of character, leading to the addiction--or addict behaviour, he or she is likely to have an unwelcome experience with the vegetal tea.
Drinking the Tea, is an intense, life-changing experience. Often, even a hard-core addict/alcoholic will be changed after only a few sessions, as that one is faced with the "why" of the addiction.
Drinking the Tea is not in itself addictive, except for the understanding that becoming a better person, truer to one's true self, is "addicting"--if that is entirely possible.

I am a member of the Unao do Vegetal Church(UDV), and treat the sessions of drinking the Tea as a church, or religious/spiritual experience. This does not replace, nor substitute for my attendance at regular AA/12-step meetings. These two groups do different, yet related, things.
All the above stated, I generally don't share this side of my life with many people I attend meetings with.
Most won't/don't understand the place that the tea holds in my life. This is fine. I'm not trying to change anyone else, nor get folks involved in a different program, or change their minds.

The orthodox belief of the program is that there should be no "drug usage", except what is prescribed by a licensed doctor. Yet, having been to enough doctors, I have not found one which has diagnosed my "problem" correctly.
Relative to an addict, or alcoholic in recovery: if s/he finds that the Program itself isn't addressing additional mental inbalances, or issues, or one is "dually diagnosed"; then perhaps the answer might be found within a session of drinking the Tea.
So while the Tea provides a number of physical benefits (a type of internal, and mental cleaning, in addition to psychic clearing, improved memory, and emotional stability) which no "anti depressant" can provide, it is important to remember that drinking the tea is a spiritual pursuit.
If one is not ready to embark on a spiritual journey and solution to his or her problem, then the Tea may prove more detrimental, or harmful than it would prove to be beneficial.
hydronaut a écrit :Hey guys,

as an addicted you dont are "allowed" to use any drug any time again in your life - even one swallow alcohol will turn you back into the daily drug abuse (that is how the medicine-science said).

But maybe there is a difference in taking Ayahuasca to understand its own addiction more and more and mybe to see the real reasons for its addiction? Is that daydreaming or possible to take Ayahuasca without being relapsed?

Thank you very much!

hydronaut a écrit :Hey guys,

as an addicted you dont are "allowed" to use any drug any time again in your life - even one swallow alcohol will turn you back into the daily drug abuse (that is how the medicine-science said).

But maybe there is a difference in taking Ayahuasca to understand its own addiction more and more and mybe to see the real reasons for its addiction? Is that daydreaming or possible to take Ayahuasca without being relapsed?

Thank you very much!

I'm also a recovering alchoholic and I haven't had a drink in 25yrs. After attending thousands of AA meetings across the U.S. and many foreign countries - my impression is that AA literature and the majority of members attempt to oversimplify alcohol and drug addiction. As well, it seems very common for members to adopt dogmatic beliefs and personal experiences and portray them as universal truths. I commonly hear things like: "It is my experience that only a Higher Power can cure an addiction--of any type. Until a person finds a H.P. (Higher Power) which works in his/her life, s/he WILL use again; or substitute one substance for another. " Well, I am atheist and haven't had a drink in 25 years. As well, there is a vibrant atheist AA community that hold international conferences.

One of the slogans that resonates with me is "Be True to Yourself". Each of us has a unique physiology and unique set of life experiences. I had adopted many beliefs and later discovered they were not true. Such as: "all drugs are the same. If you take any of them, it will send you back into addiction. I have realized I am not addicted to all drugs. Alcohol and marijuana is my kryptonite and I believe they would severely harm me (I'm sure others I have never tried like meth or heroine would as well). Yet, four years ago I was diagnosed with ADHD and was prescribed Adderral. I take a small dosage only 4X a week and I periodically take month-long breaks. I have not experienced addictive thoughts or behavior. Some may say, well that is different - it is taken as prescribed. Well, two years ago I was prescribed Norco after undergoing surgery to remove a large kidney stone. I STILL have half that bottle. I forget about it and take ibuprofen for pain. Perhaps once every two months I take half a Norco (which is not as prescribed). It has no power over me. My mind and body is just not addicted to it. Contrary to beliefs that were programmed into me, I have not tumbled back to alcohol and drug abuse. However, my relationship with alcohol and pot is different and I believe they would take over my life.

My biggest concern is my intention. Why would I want to use alcohol, drug or medication. Is it for escape? Is it to set myself up for relapse? Is it to avoid dealing with life? Or is it to treat a condition or as therapy?

I've done an Aya retreat and it was the most profound experience of my life. It took me places 20 years of meditation, self help and therapy has not. My intention was to go beyond my ego and identify blocks to deeper connections and inner truth. It was extremely difficult physically and mentally. I dreaded the ceremonies. Yet, if felt an calling to do so. And in the end I was shown deep fears and insecurities - and how they block me from my true nature. I experienced deep levels of empathy, compassion, connection and love.

Aya is powerful and can be used as medicine or a drug. I met lots of people in Peru that had been doing Aya every week for years. It was a lifestyle. I met others that did it once and never again. Every person is different.
Haven't tried Ayahuasca yet, but I have heard many positive things and positive effects about this natural psychedelics.
Yes, this would most certainly work, since it expands your mind in such an incredible way, that the only way to make sence of it all is to seriously question the path you are currently on. It's named/deamed appropriately.. 'living a thousand years, in a matter of hours'.